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Reflux

Antacids are a type of medicine that can provide immediate relief from indigestion. They work by neutralising the acid in your stomach (making it less acidic), so that it no longer irritates the protective lining (mucosa) of your digestive system. These changes can often result in acid reflux, the most common cause of indigestion.

Heartburn can show itself as a discomfort (especially after eating), bloating, wind, burping and nausea. You’ll be able to compare notes with a lot of other mum friends as up to eight out of ten pregnant women get heartburn (NICE, 2017) .

Reflux is not associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and therefore treatment aims to relieve symptoms for women. There is limited evidence on the effectiveness and safety of current interventions. Generally, the first approach is advice on diet and lifestyle, either to reduce acid production or avoid reflux associated with postural change ( Richter 2005 ) . Reflux (heartburn) is very common antenatally. While it is considered a normal part of a healthy pregnancy, symptoms may be frequent and distressing to women.

And as the uterus grows, it pushes on the stomach. This can sometimes force stomach acid up into the esophagus. Many women who have heartburn during pregnancy have never had problems before. Unfortunately, if you had heartburn before becoming pregnant, you’re more likely to have symptoms while you are pregnant. Although the exact reasons aren’t clear, most experts believe that pregnancy hormones, particularly progesterone, play a role.

When stomach acids enter the esophagus frequently or chronically, the irritation feels like a burning or pinching pain behind the breastbone or in the middle of the back called heartburn. Severe reflux can even feel like a heart attack. Frequent heartburn (more than once per week) is one sign of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Other symptoms include a sour taste in the mouth, abdominal bloating, belching, and early morning post-nasal drip.

Gastrointestinal adverse effects (such as nausea, vomiting, constipation, and diarrhoea) can occur with omeprazole. Because of their acid-suppressing effect, proton pump inhibitors may increase the risk of Clostridium difficile and other gastrointestinal infections.

These symptoms may start at any time during a pregnancy. And they often get worse throughout the pregnancy. Heartburn is common when you are pregnant.

Fortunately, heartburn usually ends with the birth of your baby and your body goes back to its nonpregnant state. Drinking a glass of milk may relieve heartburn (the burning sensation from stomach acid leaking up into your gullet). You may want to keep a glass of milk beside your bed in case you wake up with heartburn in the night.

Now that you’re expecting, talk to your practitioner about whether the prescription meds you’re taking are still okay now that you’re pregnant. Many of the tips for fighting heartburn can also help with your reflux.

What makes pregnancy different is the distortion of the organs in the abdomen and the increased abdominal pressure caused by the growing fetus. These changes clearly promote the reflux of acid.

They work by coating the lining of the esophagus and stomach and neutralizing stomach acid. Heartburn medicines called H2-blockers work by reducing the amount of acid made by your stomach. Although most of these are considered safe in pregnancy, as with all medicines, these should be avoided in the first trimester. Most spicy, greasy, fatty foods known for causing heartburn are also likely to cause problems for pregnant women. Food doesn’t digest as well or move as quickly during pregnancy.

GERD is incredibly common. About 40 percent of Americans experience GERD on a monthly basis and about 30 to 50 percent of pregnant women complain of symptoms, according to the National Institutes of Health. Why Am I So BloatedBloating is a feeling that your abdomen is distended or larger than normal, but it does not necessarily mean that it is.

However, each woman is different. Being pregnant doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll have heartburn. It depends on many factors, including your physiology, diet, daily habits, and your pregnancy.

treatment for gerd in pregnancy

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