Skip to content

Gut Health: Gabby Bernstein's Experience with SIBO, GERD and More

Even if I have a ‘cheat’ day I don’t suffer any set backs like I did when I was younger and on meds. Never underestimate the power of a good workout. It’ll help you digest your food faster and keep you feeling much better than most medications.

You might want to talk to your doctor about the advisability of getting one of these tests. Doctors can also perform a variety of tests to help them diagnose pernicious anemia. Proton Pump Inhibitors are a no no in fixing acid reflux problems. The problem really comes from TOO LITTLE stomach acid.

tums and stomach acid reactions examples happy

These aren’t as effective as the more modern drugs because they don’t prevent the acid from being made. They may provide temporary relief from a mild case of acid reflux or pain caused by acid in the stomach, but anyone who finds themselves repeatedly taking antacids needs to visit a doctor for a diagnosis and treatment. I first started experiencing symptoms many years ago. I had constant heartburn, burning stomach aches, burning mouth; I always felt nauseous and I was constantly chewing on antacids, which did not help. Then I was no longer able to eat any foods or keep anything down.

It was like magic. I was able to sleep through the night. I made an appointment with a gastroenterologist again (12 years after the first one). He was upset that I had not come sooner. The endoscope showed that I have no ulcers in the stomach, but I have esophagitis.

Over the years, because I’m allergic to the proton pump inhibitors (and some people think they’re not a good idea, anyway) I’ve reduced my acid reflux by taking no medicines and eating smaller portions of non-acidic healthy foods. It works just fine. I even tossed my raised pillow. It took about 6 months to redo my eating habits, during which I learned from each isolated goof-up which bad habits were the chief offenders.

If your vet suspects that acid reflux is the culprit of your dog’s symptoms he or she may perform blood tests, and listen to your dog’s digestive tract with a stethoscope. However, it is often necessary to visualize your dog’s esophagus and stomach to determine the cause of the problem. Heartburn occurs when stomach acids and other digestive liquids rise from the stomach into the esophagus. Accordingly, doctors and veterinarians often call it acid reflux.

In 1996 my new doctor realized that I did not have an esophageal sphincter and in early 1997 I had fundoplication surgery to help manage the acid that kept going up my throat. The surgery came undone less than a year later. At the time I was only 22 years old so my doctors didn’t think that I should have another surgery until I’m much older and it was up to me to stay on medication for the rest of my life. I chose to not take anything except for the occasional antacid and instead managed my diet. I’m 36 years old now and I’ve only had to be on meds twice since I was 22.

  • It took me seven months to write this blog because I wanted to make sure I was spiritually healed from the trauma that my gut inflammation caused.
  • The pain got worse and every time I ate my stomach would blow up like a balloon.
  • That part of the plan is the most difficult.

I mean I’m not saying I’m the only one, but sometimes it worries me, like I wonder if it’s gonna hurt me somehow, and not a lot of people understand what it is. They say “oh ya, GERD is just heartburn, no big deal” but to me, it is. Like others I had stomach ache as a child, heartburn in pregnancy and a ‘delicate stomach’ thereafter. My baby daughter was diagnosed as lactose intolerant, and I thought I might be too, so cut out the dairy.

I have been suffering from heartburn, constipation, severe bloating and generally GI discomfort since my teenage years. I am now 33 and was finally diagnosed with GERD and hiatal hernia following a barium swallow and gastroendoscopy. Was told that my esophagus was “raw” because of all the acid reflux and was immediately put on Nexium which I took for about 3 months.

I’m not suggesting that you deprive yourself, but I am recommending you eat less in one sitting. When you overeat you tax your digestive tract, which can make it harder for the acid in your stomach to breakdown the food. If you chew well and eat less, you assist your digestive juices in digesting your food.

Nevertheless, he has instructed me to double up on the PPI at least until he schedules a repeat endoscopy in 6 months (and I strongly suspect he will then recommend my staying on that regimen for life.) He claims that many my age (77) are on this dosage of a proton pump inhibitor for the long term without ill effect, and he says my complete lack of symptoms is due to the fact that my reflux does not reach high enough for me to be aware of it. Still, I am very apprehensive about this high dosage every day, although after a week on this increased dosage I have experienced only slight, intermittent stomach pain but more frequent nighttime bloating and gas. I have read that this high dosage, at my age, can make one more susceptible to fractures (blocks absorption of calcium?) and I am an active skier.

I already had IBS, but the gum seemed to make it much worse. I wouldn’t recommend it to anyone who has gastrointestinal problems in addition to heartburn. This was right before my 21st birthday, so afterwards, during that time in my life, I attended alot of parties, but my stomach would often sour (time of night, food, etc.). I’m not at all saying that there isn’t a diet that works best for most people most of the time. I, personally, believe that this is the case.

I have tried avoiding all the usual triggers and have also had 2 very unsuccessful attempts on PPIs. After trying the first for 3 weeks I stopped as there was no change at all and it ended up making me feel worse. With the second I have been on them for almost a month (2 a day 30mg) and again no change whatsoever. It is making me very low.

Contact your doctor if you’ve got severe stomach cramps and/or your diarrhea and vomiting don’t subside after three days. My family doctor decided that perhaps because of my taking so much NSAID’s I gave myself a stomach ulcer. He gave me a proton pump inhibitor (PPI).

tums and stomach acid reactions examples happy

Be First to Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *